EK 36060 The Clash
Produced by Mickey Foote
Released on April 8, 1977
UK CHART POSITION #12 . . . US CHART POSITION #126 . . . GOLD RECORD
Find it at GEMM
EK 36060 cover
[high resolution scan]
 

H ere’s how it went down, history buffs: The Sex Pistols fired the first shot, a riot ensued, and The Clash came out the victors. Released in the UK, The Clash’s debut album actually beat Bollocks to market by six months (though “Anarchy in the U.K.” trumped everything). After 1977, nothing would be the same; the rules had changed. Fittingly, England’s revolution arrived here in the import bins. The album didn’t get a proper US release until 1979, and only as a radically revised version that took advantage of all the singles in between. The US version is thus an early best-of album, not as historically important as the original UK elpee but a bigger bang for the buck. The original UK release did contain some great moments: “White Riot,” “Remote Control,” “I’m So Bored with the U.S.A.,” “London’s Burning.” But The Clash grew fast like fungus. The strides made on “Clash City Rockers” and “White Man in Hammersmith Palais” sounded years removed from “Garageland,” not months. It was like they knew they were playing on borrowed time and tried to cram ten years of musical development into a five-year span. Of the early punk bands (and punk is a poor label, since what separates The Clash from The Who is fashion, not fundamentals), none took their music so seriously. The Pistols were a publicity stunt, The Buzzcocks simple (but brilliant) balladeers. The Clash weren’t mere anarchists but architects who dragged rock kicking and screaming into the next stage of design. They weren’t perfectionists, the results weren’t always pretty, but every song was an opportunity to tweak the formula. Especially in the twin-guitar attack of Joe Strummer and Mick Jones, you’ll hear what sounds like walls of noise merge into unlikely music. The Pistols may get credit for the revolution, but they were sloganeers who simply attracted the media. The Clash articulated punk for the restless intellectuals, who in turn elevated it to an art form.

EK 36060 back cover
EK 36060 back cover

TRACK LISTING

  1. JANIE JONES
  2. REMOTE CONTROL
  3. I'M SO BORED WITH THE U.S.A.
  4. WHITE RIOT
  5. HATE AND WAR
  6. WHAT'S MY NAME
  7. DENY
  8. LONDON'S BURNING
  9. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
  10. CHEAT
  11. PROTEX BLUE
  12. POLICE AND THIEVES
  13. 48 HOURS
  14. GARAGELAND

    US reissue track listing
  15. CLASH CITY ROCKERS
  16. I'M SO BORED WITH THE U.S.A.
  17. REMOTE CONTROL
  18. COMPLETE CONTROL
  19. WHITE RIOT
  20. WHITE MAN IN HAMMERSMITH PALAIS
  21. LONDON'S BURNING
  22. I FOUGHT THE LAW    (Sonny Curtis)
  23. JANIE JONES
  24. CAREER OPPORTUNITIES
  25. WHAT'S MY NAME    (Joe Strummer/Mick Jones/Keith Levine)
  26. HATE AND WAR
  27. POLICE AND THIEVES    (Junior Murvin/Lee Parry)
  28. JAIL GUITAR DOORS
  29. GARAGELAND

    Bonus 7-inch with original US release
  30. GATES OF THE WEST
  31. GROOVY TIMES

    All songs written by Joe Strummer/Mick Jones unless noted

CREDITS

TORY CRIMES -- drums
MICK JONES -- guitars, vocals
PAUL SIMONON -- bass
JOE STRUMMER -- guitars, vocals
Kate Simon -- front photograph
Rocco Macauley -- back photography

return to THE CLASH discography

REGION RELEASE DATE LABEL MEDIA ID NUMBER FEATURES
UK April 8, 1977 CBS LP 82000  
AUSL 1977 CBS LP SBP 234994  
US/CAN July 1979 Epic LP JE 36060 w. bonus 7-inch
UK/NET   CBS LP/CS 32232/40-32232  
US   Epic LP PE 36060  
US   Epic CD EK 36060  
UK 1999 Columbia CD 495344 digital remaster
US   Sony CD 63883 digital remaster
JPN 2005 Epic CD MHCP-520 same as UK listing
CAN 2006 Epic LP JE 36060 orange vinyl, same as US listing

 

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