82528-4 Counterparts
Produced by Peter Collins and Rush
Released on October 19, 1993
US CHART POSITION #2 . . . GOLD RECORD (12/7/93) . . . UK CHART POSITION #14
Find it at GEMM
82528-4 cover  

S tarlog 040310.0736: Counterparts goes dingo. Tape malfunction, and the anticipated Rush reverts to Primus (choppy, warped). Engineering will requisition a better counterpart on disc, but until then a little emptiness dogs me, whispers from the corridors “counterparts,” fills the spaces between my footsteps as it speaks its name in a fabric’s friction. The review from yesterday was terrible. A band that puts so much energy into a work of art should fuel ambition, and trouble in Cazetistan left me underfueled yesterday. Not just me, of course. Rush is a machine, and the smooth hum of their parts has lulled others into a sleepiness that finds the quaternity pre-charted: great, good, fair, alright already. Then rinse it out with a live show and repeat. At least that’s the hidden rhythm heard chugging in the machine since Signals. Presto clearly found them recharged, Roll The Bones not so much, and Counterparts should have been running on half a tank by previous estimates. No. This is a better album than Presto. This is a better album than I’ve heard from Rush in a long time. Maybe it’s because I saw the live show (thank you Johnny B. for dragging me). Maybe it’s because I owned this on tape, and played it constantly (familiarity breeds fanatical devotion, transferring the notes from the magnetic strip and coding them into your brain). Again, no. It’s the songs. “Cold Fire,” “Alien Shore,” “Between Sun & Moon,” “Stick It Out,” “Animate.” Any one of them could have rolled around on the radio as the new single from the Rush album, and fans would have snatched up Counterparts with gusto. The honor instead fell to “Nobody’s Hero,” which got under my skin like few songs do (actually, for me the reference point is probably Big Country’s “Come Back To Me”). Thematically, Counterparts speaks to the relationships between man and woman (in case the nut-and-bolt illustration wasn’t obvious enough), the role that sex plays in life and death, searching for a balance between masculine and feminine, and an instrumental (“Leave That Thing Alone!”) that might be better left to the imagination. Neil Peart’s lyrics and Geddy Lee’s bass have sounded better on past efforts, Alex Lifeson’s guitar hasn’t sounded this good in a while, but it’s the melodies that stick out. To my ears, this is probably as close as Rush has come to making a King’s X album (though I’m reversing the formula), another band that just seems to get better with age. In other words, some of the most intelligent metal this side of Dr. Theopolis (which kinda ends where we started).

82528-4 lyric booklet
82528-4 lyric booklet

TRACK LISTING

  1. ANIMATE
  2. STICK IT OUT
  3. CUT TO THE CHASE
  4. NOBODY'S HERO
  5. BETWEEN SUN & MOON    (music: Geddy Lee/Alex Lifeson, lyrics: Neil Peart/Dubois)
  6. ALIEN SHORE
  7. THE SPEED OF LOVE
  8. DOUBLE AGENT
  9. LEAVE THAT THING ALONE!
  10. COLD FIRE
  11. EVERYDAY GLORY

    Music by Geddy Lee and Alex Lifeson, lyrics by Neil Peart unless noted. Arrangements by Rush and Peter Collins.

CREDITS

GEDDY LEE -- bass guitar, vocals, synthesizers
ALEX LIFESON -- electric and acoustic guitars
NEIL PEART -- drums, cymbals, electronic percussion
Michael Kamen -- orchestral arranger and conductor (4)
John Webster -- additional keyboards
Kevin (Caveman) Shirley -- engineer
Michael Letho -- mixing
Hugh Syme -- art direction, illustration and design
Andrew MacNaughtan -- photography

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REGION RELEASE DATE LABEL MEDIA ID NUMBER FEATURES
CAN 1993 Anthem CD 1067  
US/EEC October 19, 1993 Atlantic LP/CD/CS 82528 lyric sleeve

 

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